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past issues

 

documents

2014/september

 

Series CUING - CANGA (III)
Couple – Roofframe

In this document, the third of this series, we will be comparing a specific definition of the Gaelic word ceangal and its derivatives to specific meanings of the Galician-Portuguese words canga, cango and their derivatives. All these words are directly related to the meaning “couple”, “joist”, “beam” and “roof support”.

 

PUBLISHED: 09/09/2014
 

Series CUING - CANGA (II)
To yoke - To unyoke / To dislocate

In this second document of the series we compare some Gaelic verbs derived from the words cuing, “yoke”, and ceangal, “tie”, “binding” to Romance verbs derived from the words canga and cangalla.

 

 

 

PUBLISHED: 02/09/2014
 

DOBHAR - DOIRA
Water – Flood - Torrent

In this paper we focus on some Galician words such as duira, doira or doiro, “water”, “torrent”, etc. We will try to show that these words are directly related to the term dobhar, “water”, “flood”, “torrent”, in Irish Gaelic, as well as to some Galician place-names, such as Catoira, A Gaiteira, Os Guidoiros, and to Gaoth Dobhair, the Irish place-name anglicized as Gweedore.

PUBLISHED: 04/09/2014
 

LOSCUD – LOSCADH - LOSQUEADA
Act of inflicting burning pain - Slap

In this document we will focus on the relationship between the Galician word losqueada, “blow given with the back of the hand”, and the Irish Gaelic word loscadh and Scottish Gaelic word losgadh, both from the Old Irish root loscud, “act of inflicting burning pain”.

PUBLISHED: 11/09/2014
 

LUSCO-FUSCO
Twilight

In this document we see the relationship between the Romance word lusco, “one-eyed”, and some of the specific meanings of the Gaelic words losc and loscud. Our intention is finding a possible relationship between these latter words and the Galician and Portuguese noun lusco-fusco, “twilight”, “dusk”.

PUBLISHED: 12/09/2014